Posts Tagged ‘facebook’

Podcast Of The Month: April

May 7, 2008

Without doubt the podcast of the month for April goes to For Immediate Release which I usually have problems keeping up with (it’s released twice a week, one hour each), but the content for April was excellent and I found myself listening to it first among my podcasts.

  • #336 highlights: Using Twitter/Friendfeed differently for business, conducting proper blogger outreach
  • #337 highlights: Facebook tools that can really help you
  • Live call in show #5 highlights: How should companies reach out in social media without offending the people in it? Great analogy of standing at a party table and interjecting about insurance while they’re talking about something else.
  • #338 highlights: Kami Hyuse Seaworld case study and talk of the virtual internet
  • #339 highlights: Dan York & Sallie Goetsch take over. Lots of Twitter news and I have a comment left via Twitter!

I have to say, hands down, if you’re doing anything in the digital/social media space, you need to be listening to this podcast.

Other notable listens this month:

  • Inside PR #106 – Live episode with a great question “Who owns the social media space?”
  • Managing the Gray – Manic Mummies episode, great case study on GM and how to do sponsorship in social media.
  • Marketing Over Coffee – “Captcha and Turk“, lots of stuff on startups as well as a whole slew of WordPress plugins I never knew about.
  • Shill #6 meandered a little this month, but still a worthwhile discussion about whether there’s any value in re-posting news.
  • Six Pixels Of Separation #98 (interview with Collin Douma), #99 (very interesting, almost counter-intuitive information regarding online reviews) and #100 (long conversation between Mitch, Brian Eisenberg and Avinash Kaushik).

Did you listen to any of these podcasts? Are you listening to different podcasts? I’m always on the lookout for great social media related podcasts, recommendations always welcome.

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I’m A SocialThing!

April 10, 2008

FriendFeed has been getting quite a bit of coverage lately, but SocialThing! is slowly but surely creeping up on users. I finally got my beta invite and after playing around for awhile, I have a slight preference for SocialThing! (damn I love that exclamation mark)

Here’s a screenshot from my SocialThing! page (click for larger view):

I\'m A SocialThing!

What I like about it is that it brings whatever your friends are doing to you. If I wanted to, I could ignore Twitter and Facebook all day and just rely on SocialThing! to give me the updates I need. Google Reader can do the rest for blogs (which is a function FriendFeed essentially duplicates).

Two other benefits of SocialThing!:

  1. My friends don’t have to be on it – That’s why FriendFeed isn’t attractive to me at the moment (yes I know you can add them as imaginary friends, but it isn’t quite as fun)
  2. Less worry of information overload – If 5 friends save the same post on del.icio.us on FriendFeed, I see all 5. With SocialThing!, just one post.

The one advantage FriendFeed has over SocialThing! is the ability to comment and interact directly on the FriendFeed interface, like this (click for larger picture):

However whether or not you want to have two separate conversations going on at the same time (comments and FriendFeed) is something I’m struggling with personally.

I’d argue that SocialThing!’s job is to let me know what my friends are up to, then if I want to, I can head over to Facebook to comment or reply to Twitter directly from SocialThing!. Pretty cool, no?

If you’re on either/both platforms, let me know what your thoughts are. If you want an invite to SocialThing! let me know and I’ll pass on one to you if I can.

If you want to know more, there’s much more coverage of SocialThing!:

Do You Miss Chat? Facebook May Have The Answer.

April 7, 2008

Brian Solis over at bub.blicio.us (who is one of my new March subscriptions) posted an article on Facebook adding a new chat feature, with a link to the Facebook blog telling users about the new feature.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to be available on my Facebook yet, perhaps they’re starting with North America. Nonetheless, I’m excited to start using it.

My first reaction: great! I already think Twitter is so powerful because it almost emulates that “water cooler” or “chatroom” function that the internet used to have (I do miss the chat rooms because MSN is usually just one-to-one) and Ping.sg, a community-focused aggregator already has a chat function on the page as well. It’s almost like we’ve come full circle back to the era of chat.

The second reaction: I’m assuming that you have to remain logged in on Facebook to use the chat and see who’s online. This leads to longer time on the Facebook site, presumably more exposure to the increasing number of Facebook ads, and a way to combat Facebook Fatigue?

What do you think?

Sheylara And I Present: Social Media Breakfast Video

March 26, 2008

Sheylara and I met up just yesterday to squeeze out this video to serve as a trailer for Social Media Breakfast: Singapore happening on Saturday (full disclosure: she did most of the work and deserves most of the credit). Check it out:

I’ve been asked a few times what exactly the Social Media Breakfast is for. To me, it’s mainly for networking and meeting like-minded people who are into the social media space. That said, I think it’s perfectly fine if anyone feels that the main purpose is for fun or socialising or anything like that.

The other question is whether discussion has to be about social media, and I think the answer is no. I think it’s great to talk about the last movie you watched, or what you usually have for breakfast, or if you are a Twitter-addict. Anything goes. I suspect the true magic and connections will materialise after the event, when these relationships are allowed to grow both online and offline, as CC Chapman alludes to from his SXSW experience.

The ultimate goal of Social Media Breakfast? To me, as a believer of Mitch Joel’s belief of building communities and Joseph Jaffe’s belief of creating and joining conversations, the ultimate goal would be to really build up the social media community in Singapore, regardless of individual usages, be it personal, work, school or play.

If you’re interested in attending the event, the Facebook event page can be found here. Breakfast is $4 a person, but you will receive the personal tagging kit free!

If you need to speak to anyone to clarify anything, there’s me, Derrick or Sheylara online, or on Twitter at @uniquefrequency, @derrickkwa, @sheylara. See you on Saturday!

29th March 2008: Social Media Breakfast: Singapore

March 17, 2008

If you use social media in any way (blog/podcast/use Youtube/use Flickr/use Facebook/etc), come for Social Media Breakfast: Singapore next Saturday, 29th of March 2008!

This is a little experiment that Derrick Kwa (from Adventures in Social Media #1) thought of doing, and was generous enough to invite me along for the ride. The objective of the breakfast is simply to meet like-minded people who are into the social media scene, expand your network and of course have fun. It doesn’t matter whether you’re interested in social media from a business standpoint or a social standpoint, everyone’s invited because you never know who you’d meet!

Currently Derrick and I have two rules:

  1. Everyone’s equal. When it comes to Social Media Breakfast, there’s no difference if you’re a CEO or a student. Everyone has something of value to contribute and everyone should be treated that way
  2. Law of Two Feet applies. If a particular conversation or discussion is not getting you what you want, feel free to move on.

Both are nods to PodCamp rules and we’re sure they’re not hard to follow!

Finally, we will be borrowing an idea from Jeff Pulver regarding personal tagging. I’ll let the man explain it himself:

The venue we’re looking at is either going to be TCC at SMU or Frujch. Either way it will be in the SMU area, so it’s pretty convenient. Also, because it’s our first time trying this out there are no sponsors involved, so you have to pay for your own breakfast and we hope that’s not too big a problem! We’ll clarify the final date and time within the week.

So if you’re coming, leave me a comment or drop me an email: uniquefrequencyATgmailDOTcom or message me on Twitter and we’ll see you on the 29th!

Icio Week 10

March 9, 2008
  • Want more subscriptions? Do what Chris Brogan does: Ask!
  • Chris Clarke tells you why you should be an expert in some field to bring something special to the table. (Told you this guy only writes good stuff)
  • Maybe we’re not facing Facebook fatigue? Statistics suggest there are still plenty of unique visitors on Facebook. Maybe it’s the early and/or late majority catching up?

Facebook Developer Garage

March 5, 2008

It’s today and I got invited by Bjorn via Facebook.

I have to admit at first I was a little lukewarm because, well, I’m not a developer per se. I’m a social media junkie.

Then I got to see that marketing and monetisation of Facebook will be the topic of a panel discussion and now I really want to go because I’m really interested to know whether other people think Facebook is slowly dying out and if we’re really facing Facebook Fatigue, even here in Asia.

My personal guess is that in Asia it’s not as obvious as in the US, because if the whole world were mapped on to an adoption curve, I think people in this part of the world would probably fall under early to late majority. So there’s plenty of room yet for the m to jump on board.

Unfortunately, I strongly doubt I’ll be able to attend the event because I have a fairly important exam the next day. How much does that suck?

Anyone else going? Can I get Twitter updates?

My First Online Advertising Experience (As A Consumer)

March 3, 2008

I read an article recently regarding online advertising in Singapore & Malaysia. Apparently Google Adwords doesn’t do very well here because us Asians don’t do much click-through (ie clicking on an ad), so advertisers rather use CPM or impression based advertising on websites and blogs.

I broke the trend today and clicked on Snapfish today from a Facebook ad. They were promoting a $0.09/4R photo printout that I thought I’d try it out.

The thing that Snapfish did right is they targeted me as a consumer. (Not me personally, but people like me). I own a DSLR, take a hell lot of photos and paste them all over Facebook and Flickr.

After getting 10 free prints for signing up, I arranged to print 17 pictures for a total of $2.63, of that $1.90 is a shipping fee (probably the same amount to travel and park to and from the developing shop).

Let’s see if this works out well, will blog an update once I get the printouts in the mail. I’m really hoping it will be a success story because it’ll be great to blog about a local company that “gets” social media and online advertising.

Podcast Of The Month: February

March 3, 2008

February was when I really expanded my podcast horizons and picked up stuff other than Six Pixels Of Separation and Jaffe Juice and my winner for this month goes to:

Marketing Over Coffee: Picking On Grandma, for three reasons:

  1. Great discussion on connectors and networks.
  2. Picking on grandma isn’t as negative as it sounds, but rather serves as a reminder that companies need to develop user-friendly products. (Grandma can use an ipod much easier than some other MP3 player because itunes syncs everything)
  3. Introduction of two useful Facebook apps (I’ll be showing one tomorrow).

My other nominees:

The Lost Initiative – I almost picked this as the winner because the discussion is so quick flowing. I think the British might just be less rambly. Ultimately, I decided the winner should be social media centric, so it’s a very close #2.

Six Pixels Of Separation #91 – for the 12 minute audio interview with Rick Murray. So good.

Jaffe Juice #104 – for the weigh-ins on 10 relationships vs 5 million impressions and also for mentioning that advertising is actually anti-cyclical to economic conditions, something that I don’t think companies grasp very well.

Special mention goes to the Hack College videocast #16, where they actually explored the idea of Twitter being used as a warning system in a school shooting. I draw parallel to wondering what would have happened if Twitter was used during 9/11.

Technorati Authority = Success?

February 22, 2008

I’ve been sitting on this post for awhile, but was motivated into action by Mitch Joel over at Six Pixels Of Separation on his post regarding Technorati Authority.

Background: Technorati authority is simply a measure of how many other people are linking to you from their blogs. ie If 10 people link Unique-Frequency, my Technorati ranking is higher than if 2 people linked me. (This isn’t a new metric of “importance”, Google’s PageRank uses a similar system)

Thinking about this over the last week or so, I have to respectfully disagree with Mitch on the issue because I don’t think it’s a good indicator of whether a blog is “successful” or not.

The reason? Technorati doesn’t discriminate between links. I could have been scraped by a spam blog, just added by someone’s blogroll or mentioned in Joseph Jaffe’s UNM2PNM new marketing and they all will get picked up equally and add to my authority.

That said, of course it’s nice to have a higher authority, but does that really, tangibly mean anything? For example, Mitch has an authority of 550 on Technorati, but Jaffe has about 685. Should that mean I automatically take Jaffe to be more credible? Certainly I have learned a lot from both bloggers and would not say they should be almost 150 points apart.

Conversely, the JaffeJuice group on Facebook has 626 members while the Six Pixels Society more than doubles it at 1325 members. Does that mean anything?

Both are instances where bloggers or Facebook users have a choice whether to link or to join the groups. Some choose to, some don’t.

Here’s what I feel is the inherent flaw: You have to own a blog or be on Facebook to add to the Technorati authority or to the Facebook group’s numbers. But the number of people who are actual content creators (ie bloggers) is somewhere in the region of 13% according to a study shown in social media class. In other words, the other 87% are by default, excluded.

Now I’m not saying this is a bad metric. Obviously I love it when my authority goes up (I’m at 13). But I also know that while I have certain nice mentions by people like Louis Gray in an actual conversation, it also contains spam blog links and links on people’s blogroll, whether or not they read my blog. This difference makes me take the Technorati authority with a pinch of salt.

The system isn’t perfect, but then perhaps no system is. But personally, until this tension between discriminatory and non-discriminatory links are reconciled, I’m hesitant to place a strong emphasis on Technorati authority.